Goat, Sheep, and Pig

A couple weeks ago, we purchased some goat meat at the Ballard Farmer’s Market and turned it into an improvised goat meat stew roughly adapting a lamb and lentil soup recipe.  According to Alice Waters quince also pairs nicely with lamb meat, so I threw it in.  The meat was good, a little tough and surprisingly mild – next time I will be sure to select a recipe which adds a richer flavor to the meat.  That may prove to be a while though!  I’ve recently placed an order for half a pig (coming in December) raised by Rolling Bay Farm (can’t get much more local than around the block).  Additionally a co-worker is having a lamb butchered and I will be lucky enough to get quarter!  (All this meat means I’ll finally try my hand at making sausages…)

Goat Stew

2 tbls. olive oil
1 lb goat
1 onion
4 carrots (in large pieces)
1 quince (quartered and cored, peel on)
4 cloves garlic, thick slices
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
1.5 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp cinnamon
mint (lots – to taste)
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
1/2 cup brandy
1 1/4 cups lentils
6 cups chicken stock
1/2 cup yogurt strained (5-8 hours in refrigerator through cheese cloth)

Start the carrots and quince in a small pan of water mixed with honey.  Simmer until needed.

Heat the oil over high in a deep pan and cook the goat until browned.  Remove the meat and set aside.  Add the garlic, onion, half the mint and the other seasonings to the pot.  Cook until onion softens and then add brandy.  Cook for a couple minutes then add lentils and stock.  Bring to a boil and then simmer until the lentils are soft (about 20 minutes).  Partially blend the soup, return the meat and add the strained vegetables.  Heat for 5 minutes.  Serve with yogurt and remaining mint.

(Sadly the lentils were not local.)

Given how strong (and delicious) the odors were during cooking I expected a rich, deeply flavored dish.  However, the reality was a mild but addictive flavor which fell a little flat against the goat meat.  The quince was good, but I  overcooked it so it largely fell apart.  Individual hunks were reminiscent of pear, but more astringent.  The winner from this experiment was actually the strained yogurt!  I can’t wait to find other dishes to serve it with.

Here’s a view of the inside of the quince if anyone is curious (sorry for the quality of image).

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2 thoughts on “Goat, Sheep, and Pig

  1. We were just talking about how winter and the close of our market means we will get to go to Ballard market! I love that market but I haven’t been all summer. We should carpool sometime.

    Who’d you get the goat from? We have gotten it from the ever-awesome Sea Breeze Farm in the past.

    I might have to try that lentil recipe with another meat. Any thoughts on what I could use instead of quince?

    Does Rolling Bay Farm usually sell, or did you get a special deal for knowing someone or something? Would love to have island-grown meat.

  2. We should definitely carpool sometime – we only go about every three to four months though.

    I’m embarrassed to say that I forgot the exact farm the goat came from – it wasn’t Sea Breeze though. I’ll try to find the name.

    In terms of the recipe it was adapted from a lamb soup, which I can drop your way. (The quince was a complete “add in” so I think you’re fine without it.)

    I’m not sure if Rolling Bay Farm normally sells – they had a very limited number and I jumped on it when I heard there was a possibility!

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