Lemon Meringue Pie

One rainy day, about a decade ago when we were staunch locavores and still beginning to learn about what that meant (and how to incorporate balance), a friend left a surprise sack of lemons on my porch.  During her drive … Continue reading

Kitchen Bites

Lots going on in the kitchen these days, but I’m writing most of it up over at the Kitsap Sun. The latest thing? You need this. You really do. You’re welcome. Here’s my favorite chocolate cake recipe, coming at you just in time for February.file_001-1First in the category of ‘how I do all the cooking there is to be done on Sunday and eat for the rest of the week’…pita! I used this recipe from trusty King Arthur, substituting whole wheat flour for both the white wheat and the AP. I also stocked up on granola and bagels today. Needless to say, there was flour everywhere. (Look for an article soon about steam ovens and bagel making…uncharted territory!)file_000-1

Nut Balls

Let’s chat about nut balls. (No, not your visiting relatives…) These often masquerade as energy balls or ‘no bake’ cookies. Really, it’s just a simple vehicle for quickly getting protein into your belly. Or, in our case, into a belly of an on the go kid. These are the snacks that he requested and so we made up a batch to our liking. Using King Arthur’s formula as a guide, we made it our own with a few add ins from the pantry. I’m sure you’ll make it your own too. It’s easily customized to your little person’s preference. Be sure to assess the dough for moisture before you roll the balls. It needs to stick together and appear smooth. Go ahead and add a little drip of water if it’s too dry.

img_2143Nut Balls, A Protein Packed Snack

3/4 c. nut butter
1/3 c. honey
1/4 c. dry milk
1 tbls. raw cacoa powder (not cocoa)
1 tbls. hemp powder
2 tsp. vanilla

1 cup rolled oats
1 cups of yummy stuff: chopped nuts, seeds, coconut, or whatever you choose

  1. Haul out the food processor. Pulse the nuts and seeds, if you like. Set those aside.
  2. In the now empty bowl of the food processor, add the first group of ingredients: nut butter, honey, dry milk, powders, and vanilla. Pulse until mixed.
  3. Add in the oats and yummy stuff.
  4. With damp hands, roll this dough into balls. Coat in some more yummy stuff, if you like.

Makes about 16-24 balls, depending on size.

img_2149Notes:

  • Store in the refrigerator.
  • You can definitely do this without a food processor, mixing with muscles and a sturdy spoon. I thought that the food processor simplified the steps.
  • Look for an organic source of cacoa powder or hemp protein powder.

Holiday decorations

I had a few holiday columns over at the Kitsap Sun that you might like to check out. If you’re looking for an easy gift for kids to make or a way to embellish your own tree, you might like the recipe for salt dough ornaments.

salt dough ornaments

We plan to use them as tags for the homemade jams we made this summer. It’ll be a pretty, thrifty holiday gift.

Gingerdead Men Cookies for Halloween

imageBoo! Happy Halloween! I’m not one who usually falls for kitschy holiday things, but walking through town last year, this cookie stamp caught the child’s eye. Now, it seems to be a welcome tradition. Making gingerdead men is not only a hilarious pun (that pretty much cracks us up every time we say it) but is also a delicious fall treat to gift and munch. We used fresh, local ginger from Tani Creek, and so this cookie has a little zing that becomes addicting.

Tips for Making Gingerdead Men

  • Use your favorite chocolate sugar cookie recipe or go with our favorite. We love the chocolate ginger combination of this recipe. The dough is easy to work with (if you keep it chilled) and really holds its shape. Definitely don’t skip the fresh ginger.
  • Roll your chilled dough out thinly. To make stamping easier, flour the dough and the stamp side of the cutter.
  • Stamp first, using a small cutting board to help you press down evenly. Next, cut it out and transfer the deadman, still in the cutter, to a parchment lined sheet with a large spatula. Tap it out of the cutter directly onto the sheet.
  • Use a thicker royal icing recipe. We whisked together: 1 1/2 c. confectioners’ sugar, 3 tsp. meringue powder, 1/2 tsp. vanilla, 2 tbls. water.

 

Pear Butter and Tips For Baking Frozen Fruit Pie

I have officially declared this year’s canning season closed. I have canned all of the things. I have used all of the jars. All of them. Aside from one excusable weakness (peaches!), I stuck to my goal of only canning free fruit. This wasn’t too hard this year, actually. Even though our garden production isn’t fully up and running, when friends know you preserve, somehow bags of produce seem to make their way to your back porch. (Lucky me! But really, people, canning season is CLOSED.)

Recently a friend and I were invited to pick some pears from a regal and impressive old tree. Such a gift! I made a lot of chocolate pear jam (which I’m renaming, more appropriately pear butter) from Preserving by the Pint. I look forward to eating this on a snowy day in December in front of a fire – it’s definitely a holiday jam.

 With the pears, also, I made several pear anise pies from the one pie book you absolutely must own. On some of the pies, I added a streusel topping. I froze the pies raw and plan to bake them as needed. To do this, line your empty pie plate with plastic wrap and then build your pie on top. Freeze for about 2-3 hours, then pop out of the plate. Wrap and label. I find it helpful to list which pie plate I used since I have many of varying sizes. To bake a fruit pie from frozen, unwrap, place in plate, and pierce vents on top with a chef’s knife. Follow baking temperature and time in recipe, adding 25-30 extra minutes. If your pie begins to brown, loosely lay a square of foil on the top.

Figs Aplenty

figs aplentyA generous islander gave me some figs from a beautiful, mature tree. So, of course, I had to learn what to do with them right away! We ate a few for breakfast just straight up, with honey and chopped nuts. We gave away a few to friends who had never eaten a fig before. The rest, I found a few ways to preserve them for the rest of the year.

  • I modified this chutney recipe, using dried cherries and omitting the red pepper powder. This will be delicious in the fall and I imagine it on simple fig saladthe Thanksgiving table.
  • From Preserving by the Pint, I made fig and thyme jam. It’s already been enjoyed on cheese platters and turkey sandwiches. Yum.
  • In the steam oven, I dehydrated halved figs for 16 hours. (16?!) I was still unhappy with the level of dryness, so I packaged them for the freezer. I plan to make fig anise bread with these.